Facebook

Blog

Posts Tagged ‘wine Temecula Valley Wine Country’

GRILLED SAUSAGES WITH FIG AND ONION JAM

Thursday, May 30th, 2019

Grilled Sausages with Fig & Onion Jam

This recipe couldn’t be more perfect for a Father’s Day or summer BBQ. And chances are, you’ll find many other uses for this fragrant sweet-tart jam. Enjoy it on a grilled-cheese or ham sandwich or serve it with a cheese or charcuterie board. It’s the perfect complement for fresh goat cheese or a tangy Cheddar. Serve it with grilled sausages and pair with your favorite Temecula Valley Cabernet Sauvignon or Syrah.

Ingredients
¼ pound (125 g) dried Calimyrna figs, stems removed
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 large yellow onion, about 10 ounces (315 g), halved and thinly sliced from root to stem
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
½ teaspoon ground fennel seed
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar, or more to taste
4 fresh Italian sausages, hot or sweet, 5 to 6 ounces (155 g to 185 g) each

Directions
Put the figs in a small saucepan with 1 cup (8 fl oz/250 ml) water. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Cover and set aside for 30 minutes.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add the onion, thyme, and fennel seed. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the onions are soft, golden-brown, and sweet, about 30 minutes. Lower the heat if necessary to prevent burning.

While the onions cook, prepare a medium-hot charcoal fire or preheat a gas grill to medium-high.

Lift the figs out of the liquid with a slotted spoon and slice thinly. Add the figs to the onions, along with the sherry vinegar and 2 tablespoons of the fig-cooking liquid. Cook, stirring often, until the liquid has been absorbed and the flavors have merged, 3 to 4 minutes. Taste for seasoning. The jam should be moist with a balanced sweet-tart flavor.

Grill the sausages until they are nicely browned all over and feel firm when probed, about 10 minutes. Serve immediately with the warm jam.

Suggested Pairings:

Akash Winery ~ 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon – Bright aromas of pomegranate & fresh raspberry with hints of vanilla bean. Tart and round on the palate with tastes of cranberry, dark pepper, vanilla and cherry.

Chapin Family Vineyards ~ 2015 Syrah – Full-bodied taste, flavors of chocolate, blueberry and caramel with a hint of vanilla and finishes with a hint of spicy peppers.

Falkner Winery ~ 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon – This delicious Cabernet has wonderful flavors of blueberry, blackberry, coco, and licorice on the finish. This is an easy to drink Cabernet without heavy tannins on the finish.

Leoness Cellars ~ 2015 Cellar Selection Syrah – This Syrah offers sweet blackberry and black cherry flavors complemented by hints of tobacco, black licorice and vanilla.

Photo and recipe courtesy of the Wine Institute of California.

Share

Vine Talk: Verasion

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

 

Pinot Grigio 7_14

Leoness Cellars Pinot Grigio; July 3, 2014

Vine Talk:  Verasion

“I’ve never seen anything like it!”, says Mike Rennie, owner of Leoness Cellars and a long-time grower and vineyard manager here in the valley.  “Harvest is going to be the earliest I’ve ever seen!  We’re already seeing verasion in all of our white grape varietals – and in some of our red varietals. The sugar level in our Pinot Grigio this morning was 18%.  It’ll probably reach the 22% we look for and be ready for harvesting by mid to late July.  It’s just incredible!”

In vineyard speak, verasion is a term used to describe the changing of color in a grape cluster.  All grapes are green up this point, but as the ripening process evolves, the clusters will begin the process of turning into those recognizable hues of golds, pinks, reds and purples. The grapes at this stage are sour and immature, but during the next few weeks as the fruit matures, astringent malic acids turn into soft tartaric acids and the sugar levels begin to rise rapidly.

There’s lot of action in the vineyard during this time.  The leaf canopies are constantly being pruned to allow just the right amount of sunlight and air to circulate though the vines.  Clusters that are not ripening evenly will be dropped to allow those that are to uniformly mature.  Unlike table grapes, small berry clusters are what we’re looking for as they have a better skin to fruit ratio that ensures enhanced concentrations of flavor and structure.  And that’s a very important aspect for making quality wines!  We’ll be praying for warm and dry weather – at least through the harvest season – to allow for the long, slow ripening process that our winemakers love.

What actually triggers verasion remains a mystery, but we can be sure that Mother Nature holds all the cards!

Share
  • Categories

  • Archives

View Our Winery Map