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Why Temecula Valley’s Climate is Perfect for Wine Grapes… And Vacationers!

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

“It’s too hot to grow wine grapes in Southern California.”

We hear this a lot out in Temecula Valley. Every time we do, we smile to ourselves as it’s an open invitation to explain why this wine region is not only perfect for vacationers, but for producing world-class wines as well.

Picture your ideal vacation. Does the image of waking up to a beautiful sunrise that warms the air just enough that you can enjoy coffee out on your balcony or get in a quick morning run in slightly crisp air with no sticky humidity sound about right?

Does sitting on a patio enjoying a Southern California lunch in 72-degree weather, sun shining, not a cloud in the sky in mid-November while your friends back home are kicking muddy slush from an early snowfall off their boots before getting into their cars on a grey and dreary day sound appealing?

Imagine yourself in a luxurious king-sized bed at your hotel after a fun and sun-filled day of wine tasting, hiking or shopping, all windows open to allow in the cool night breezes to lull you to sleep.

This is vacationing in Temecula Valley, all year round. It also describes key aspects that make this region suitable for growing wine grapes.

A Mediterranean Climate is generally classified as having a long growing season (early Spring to late Fall) of moderate to warm temperatures, moderate winters and relatively low rainfall. Since regions of Mediterranean climate are influenced by cold ocean currents during the Summer months, the weather during this time is dry, stable and pleasant with strong diurnal shifts. This means that, while the days are warm and sunny, the nights cool down quickly. These regions receive most of their precipitation for the year during the Winter months.

Major wine producing regions with Mediterranean climates include Tuscany and parts of Southern Italy, the Southern Rhone Valley, Provence, most of Greece, many parts of Spain, Southern Oregon, Baja California, the Napa Valley and, of course, Temecula Valley. These are many of the regions we think of when we think of premium wines and dream travel experiences.

What makes Temecula Valley at home among these well-known wine regions is that it boasts long, sunny days that allow wine grapes to ripen and develop the sugars that will ultimately turn the grapes into wine. However, the region is home to significant maritime influence as well. Just 22-miles from the Pacific Ocean, Temecula Valley is bordered by coastal mountain ranges and inland valleys. As the sun warms the inland valleys east of Temecula, the warm air rises, forming a low-pressure area which pulls the cooler, much heavier air from the Pacific Ocean in through two breaks in the mountains — The Rainbow Gap and the Santa Margarita Gap. This cool air creates the pattern of warm sunny days, breezy afternoons and cool nights, ideal conditions for the wine grapes to develop complex flavors and aromas, while retaining pleasant balance and freshness from desirable acidity levels.

Think about it: Virtually year-round sunshine and warm or moderate temperatures, cool nights, relatively little rainfall, not to mention high quality wines, unique wine-tasting experiences, and the relaxed, welcoming vibe that is synonymous with Southern California. Whether you’re a wine enthusiast or just looking for a dream vacation, Temecula Valley should be added to your list of top wine destinations to visit.

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So, You Want to Be A Winemaker?

Thursday, August 30th, 2018

You sit down to dinner and uncork a beautiful bottle of 2014 Syrah. As you swirl and sip, you start to imagine life as a winemaker. The romance of waking up on a cool September morning, opening your blinds and looking out onto your perfectly manicured vineyards. The satisfaction of tending to your vines, watching them flourish, and ultimately fermenting and bottling the grapes for your family dinner table.

Think you’ve got what it takes?

We sat down with some of Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country’s local rockstars – our winemakers – to ask them what really goes into producing the delicious wines that we simply get to open and enjoy. From grueling hours to the infamous “black hands” to strange harvest rituals, they gave us the good, the bad and the ugly on what it takes to be a winemaker during harvest.

Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association: What does a typical day during harvest look like?

Greg Pennyroyal, Vineyard Manager, Wilson Creek Winery: It is Monday at 11: 30 PM. My crew shows up in 30 minutes. We will harvest Viognier until dawn because that is what is best for wine quality. Quality of life can wait until next year when this wine will be on my dinner table and hopefully yours. Some may say this is exceptional effort but for those of us who are possessed by the muse of Vitis Vinifera, it is the best way – no, the only way – to bring in the fruit that I have nurtured since last fall. People ask, “Why are you here in the middle of the night?” To which I quote Thoreau, “Why are you not here?”

Dakota Denton, Winemaker, Gershon Bachus Vintners: I wake up, put my boots on, and walk the vineyards in the cool of the morning. Then, it’s off to the cellar or crush pad for pump-overs and to crush more grapes. By the time this is done it is time to pull samples for the lab, a second set of pump overs and a beer to end the day. Then repeat!

Olivia Bue, Winemaker, Robert Renzoni Vineyards: First and foremost, attire: Jeans (even if it’s 100° F out), old t-shirt (stained with the previous vintage’s wine), steel toe boots (always make sure to shake out dirt and grape skins), big harvest hat…Oh, and of course our purple cracked hands.

Then the day consists of early morning vineyard visits to collect grape samples for analysis; hydrometer and temperature readings on all fermenting wines; smelling the top of each fermenting tank to make sure there are no off odors or nutrient deficiencies (making sure to not get too close, lest we get hit with a CO2 bomb); and, most importantly, tasting each lot daily.

Once reds come in the real harvest bootcamp begins! This means pump-overs 3 times daily with at least 3 hours off in between. This involves sanitizing all hoses and pumps before and after each lot, making any necessary adjustments to the wine, and removing fallout seeds to minimize astringency. As the reds approach the end of alcoholic fermentation, it’s time to drain the tank of all its wine, leaving behind skins to get pressed out. To remove skins from the tank, we jump inside to shovel them out into the bins below the tank door. This is always a good workout!

TVWA: What is the hardest part of harvest?

DD: Waking up early.

OB: When my alarm goes off at 3 AM.

Gus Vizgirda, Winemaker, Wilson Creek Winery: The harvest has its many expected effects, such as exhaustion. But one that is seldom talked about is what I like to call the “Black Hand.” This happens when calloused hands come in contact with red grape juice. It is the natural condition of a winemaker during harvest. As much as “Black Hand“ is an honorable winemaking badge, it has disadvantages. My wife thinks it’s disgusting and makes me look dirty; and my grandchildren think that I have some sort of disease, avoiding my hugs. So, if you see me around during this time of the year with my hands in my pockets, understand this: I have “Black Hand.” I’m polite not to show it in public, but – believe me – in the privacy of my home late at night I look at my hands in wonderment and passionate pride, remembering the good times I had this Harvest… and longing for grandchildren’s hugs.

TVWA: What is your favorite part of harvest?

GV: Getting to the winery at 3 AM. I love to work in the morning and see the sunrise as we are pressing the grapes. I enjoy completing most of the work before the heat of the day.

OB: Processing grapes as the sun rises. And, when the last lot is pressed out; not because harvest is over but because I can finally look back and feel proud of all the blood, sweat and tears put into the vintage.

DD: The nonstop craziness from start to finish.

Joseph Wiens, Winemaker, Wiens Family Cellars: The change of pace is welcoming. We are busy bottling non-stop before crush to free up our tank space, so we look forward to getting back into the harvest season. This is also our first look at the new vintage. We’re excited to see the fruit that we’ve been watching mature on the vines finally come in for processing into wine.

TVWA: Do you have any harvest rituals – before, during or after?

DD: Every harvest I stop shaving (not saying I ever started).

OB: Happy hour at 9am.

JW: We have a rule that after our first 8 hours of work for the day, we can start cracking brews to get us through the remainder of the day.

Javier Flores, Winemaker, South Coast Winery & Carter Estate Winery: The Sunday before Harvest, I pray for a good crop and that no one gets hurt. A safe harvest is a good harvest. Then the very first day of Harvest we buy breakfast burritos for all the winemaking team members to celebrate the beginning. The very last day of Harvest we hang a plastic Skeleton with dates marking the start and finish of the harvest. Then the following Friday we have a super lunch at our winery, prepared by winemakers.

GV: I play my bugle at passing hot air balloons and play “Reveille” at sunrise for [Wilson Creek owners] Rosie and Gerry. The balloon passengers are always surprised.

TVWA: What is the craziest/scariest/funniest thing that has happened to you during harvest?

DD: Not knowing that a keg that it was still fermenting, I started to open it. After the second turn of the clamp, there was a loud bang (as if a shotgun had gone off right in front of me), and wine shot up to the ceiling, covering me from head to toe.

JW: A couple of years ago, we got a new press. We overloaded it with Zinfandel that had fallen apart (the skins didn’t hold up, and the whole lot looked more like a grape smoothie than wine). The Zin smoothie clogged up the drain holes in the press, and once the press started pressurizing, the wine had nowhere to go. The seals on the press broke open, and about 4 tons of purple slop poured out onto the crush pad. We frantically started trying to shovel it up, and soon decided it was a lost cause. We were up to our ankles with slop, and one of our workers made a snide remark. I flung a shovel full of slop at them, which devolved into a full-fledged Zin slop fight. It was a huge mess, and a bummer to lose some wine, but we laughed about it in the end, and learned the limitations of our new press!

TVWA: What is the timeline of a bottle of wine, from planting to uncorking it for dinner?

JW: It really depends on the wine. We will actually start bottling our 2018 white wines in early October. These early bottlings (like our dry rosés, Albariño and Pinot Grigio) have light, volatile aromatics that tend to flash off if we wait too long to bottle, so we try to capture that freshness as early as possible. We could be enjoying a nice, crisp rosé of Pinot Noir for dinner while we are still processing reds! Our red wines take anywhere from 1 to 4 years to make it onto our lists, as their aromas and flavors develop slowly with barrel ageing. Typically with newly planted vines, it is the “third leaf,” or third growing season, before we harvest any fruit. So, planting-to-uncorking could be as short as 4 years for our whites, to more than 40 for some of our old vine reds.

DD: Anywhere from 5 to 10 years depending on what kind of wine, and how long you are aging the wine in barrels and bottles.

Special thanks to the Temecula Valley winemakers who shared their harvest stories with us for this article.

Next time you uncork, take a moment to reflect on just what went into making that magical juice in your bottle, and give a toast to your local winemakers.

Happy harvest to winemakers all over the world, and happy California Wine Month to all.

Photo courtesy of Burlile Photography

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50th Anniversary Commemorative Wine ~ Now Available!

Friday, June 29th, 2018

The Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association (TVWA) today announced the launch of their 50th Anniversary commemorative wine, a blend of Temecula Valley Syrah, Grenache and Mourvèdre produced and bottled in Temecula Valley by Temecula Valley winemakers.

The collaborative effort was led by TVWA’s enology committee, made up of Jim Hart of Hart Winery, Phil Baily of Baily Winery and Jon McPherson of South Coast Winery and Carter Estate Winery. The team presented numerous possibilities for consideration, including a Bordeaux blend, a “Super Tuscan”-style blend and an offbeat concoction made up of Portuguese and other classic international grapes, before landing on the final product, a blend of 50% Syrah, 26% Grenache and 24% Mourvèdre.

“Temecula Valley’s Mediterranean climate makes it well-suited to grow a lot of different grape varieties, which made this a particularly interesting exercise,” said Jon McPherson, Master Winemaker at South Coast Winery and Carter Estate. “Making this wine allowed us to dig deeper on who we are as a region. What we concluded is that this diversity of offerings is what makes us unique. The 50th Anniversary wine is only one example of a blend of grapes that truly shine in Temecula Valley. The possibilities were actually endless.”

Located just 22 miles inland from the Pacific Ocean, Temecula Valley is bordered by valleys and coastal mountains ranging from 2,000 to 11,000 feet elevation. This creates a low-pressure area characterized by warm days, afternoon breezes and cool nights. Marine air is pulled into the Valley through two low-elevation points in the mountains – the Rainbow Gap and the Temecula Gorge — which allows wine grapes to develop full ripeness while maintaining desirable acidity levels.

“This wine is the perfect representation of our 50th Anniversary theme – the People, Passion and Perseverance of Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country,” said Krista Chaich, TVWA Executive Director. “Our talented winemakers came together to lend their expertise and deep commitment to this Valley in order to craft a wine that is not just delicious now, but that will stand the test of time…as our region has done over the past 50 years and will continue to do for the next 50. We cannot wait to share this wine with consumers.”

Temecula Valley grows over two dozen grape varieties. In addition to the Syrah, Grenache and Mourvèdre that make up the 50th Anniversary wine, those that especially thrive include common Italian varieties like Sangiovese, Montepulciano, Vermentino and Arneis; classic Bordelaise grapes like Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Malbec; other Rhône Varieties like Viognier and Grenache Blanc; Spanish grapes like Tempranillo; and offbeat varieties like the Portuguese Touriga Nacional and Southern Italian Falanghina.

The 50th Anniversary wine will be available for purchase at special events and through Hart Winery. The wine will retail for $50 per 750 ml bottle. Special etched magnums will also be available for purchase.  There are limited quantities available!

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Doffo Winery Takes Top Prize!

Friday, December 1st, 2017

Visit Temecula Valley (VTV), in coordination with Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association (TVWA), recently announced the winners of the second annual People’s Choice Blind Tasting. The event took place on Sunday, November 12, 2017, at Leoness Cellars, and featured a walk-around blind tasting, a wine seminar led by Master of Wine Roger Bohmrich and a 6-course awards dinner paired with last year’s winning wines.

Doffo Winery’s 2015 Zinfandel took first place in the competition, after taking second place to Wilson Creek’s Petite Sirah at last year’s inaugural event. The 2017 second place winner was Lorimar Winery’s 2014 Syrah, and third place was taken by Thornton Winery’s 2014 Estate Syrah.

“We are beyond thrilled with receiving 1st Place in the People’s Choice competition,” said Damian Doffo, CEO and Winemaker for Doffo Winery. “We work very hard in the vineyard to produce high quality fruit and make exceptional wine. We look forward to sharing our wine with the public in February.”

Over 200 guests tasted 29 wines (6 whites and 23 reds) without knowing any of the wines’ identities, and rated them on a scale of 1-5 during a walk-around wine tasting. The top 12-scoring wines from this portion of the event went on to be poured during a wine seminar led by Master of Wine Roger Bohmrich, where they were again tasted blind and rated on a scale of 1-5, including by Roger himself. Final scores were tallied to determine the top 3 “People’s Choice” wines. Wines could be any variety or a blend, at any price point, as long as they were from the Temecula Valley American Viticultural Area (AVA). Entries ranged from just $24 per bottle to well over $100, and represented a number of grape varieties, from Falanghina to Syrah to Cabernet Franc.

In addition to the walk-around tasting and seminar, the event featured a six-course dinner created by Chef Daragh Matheson from Leoness Cellars, paired with last year’s People’s Choice winners. A VIP reception offered hand-selected pours presented by local winemakers and winery owners. San Diego singer-songwriter Christian Taylor performed throughout the tasting. The evening’s dinner program was emceed by Lindsay Pomeroy, Master of Wine Candidate and owner of the “Wine Smarties” school in San Diego, and a brief keynote was delivered by Bohmrich. Local musician Brian Stodart performed throughout the dinner program.

Sponsors included Gosch Ford, 34° Crisps, Palpula Dips & Sauces, Temecula Lavender Co., Old Town Spice & Tea Merchants, Aall In Limo & Party Bus, Grapeline Wine Tours and American AgCredit. Carter Estate Winery & Resort was the official hotel partner for the event.

The top twelve scoring wines in alphabetical order were as follows:

Avensole Winery 2014 Malbec, $32.95
Baily Vineyard & Winery 2014 Malbec, $25.00
Doffo Winery 2015 Zinfandel, $72.00
Falkner Winery 2014 Rock Creek Syrah, $49.95
Fazeli Cellars 2014 Shiraz, $48.00
Hart Winery 2014 Volcanic Ridge Vineyard Syrah, $60.00
Leoness Cellars 2014 CS Cabernet Franc-Merlot, $38.00
Lorimar Winery 2014 Syrah, $48.00
Miramonte Winery 2014 Estate Syrah, $65.00
South Coast Winery 2016 Viognier, $25.00
Thornton Winery 2014 Estate Syrah, $49.00
Wiens Family Cellars 2015 Sangiovese, $44.00

Most wines can be purchased directly online through each winery’s website. The entire list of wines entered into the competition can be accessed HERE.

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2nd Annual People’s Choice Blind Tasting & Awards

Monday, September 25th, 2017

What is Temecula Valley’s best wine? You Decide!

On Sunday, November 12, join fellow wine enthusiasts and Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country movers and shakers at the second annual People’s Choice Blind Tasting and Awards!

Let your palate guide you through dozens of Temecula Valley’s best wines. Rate them and help crown the region’s favorites at a 5-course wine dinner and celebration. Never been to a blind tasting? Rest assured you won’t be blindfolded. You will simply not know which wines you are tasting until they are revealed after the event, allowing for total objectivity in your tasting.

DATE AND TIME:
Sun, November 12, 2017
Beginning at 11AM

LOCATION:
Leoness Cellars
38311 De Portola Road
Temecula, CA 92592

Three ticket levels allow you to take part in some or all of this exciting event:

People’s Choice Temecula

Estate Pass – $40: Entrance to the walk-around blind tasting from 11 AM – 1 PM of Temecula Valley’s best wines. Rate them all and help determine the region’s favorites. Enjoy light appetizers while you sip & mingle.

Reserve Pass – $175: Entrance to the walk-around blind tasting (11 AM – 1 PM) + seat at the People’s Choice awards dinner (6:30 PM – 9:30 PM), including 5-course tasting menu and wine pairings.

Grand Reserve Pass – $225: The ultimate wine-lovers package! From 3:30 – 5:30, enjoy a Temecula Valley wine seminar and seated/guided blind tasting led by Master of Wine Roger Bohmrich. Then head straight into an intimate winemaker reception including open wine bar and gourmet passed hors d’oeuvres from 5:30 – 6:30 PM. The reception will be followed by the People’s Choice awards dinner, including 5-course tasting menu and wine pairings from 6:30 – 9:30 PM, where the winning wines will be announced. Grand Reserve Pass holders will also receive a VIP gift bag and are welcome to attend the walk-around tasting (11 AM – 1 PM).

For tickets, click here

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#TemeculaWineChallenge Contest: Experience Southern California Wine Country to Win!

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Mid-week is the best time to taste Temecula Valley wines, as your chances of getting a behind the scenes tour, meeting a winemaker, or snagging a barrel sample run high – you just have to ask! This California Wine Month, take your wine knowledge to the next level. From September 1-30, we invite you to explore Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country like a true wine photojournalist…and win a cool prize or two while you’re at it.

How it works:

Step 1: Pick your wine milestone from the list of 10 different challenges below.
Step 2: Take a pic. Make sure we can see the full experience.
Step 3: Post and tag. Post on Instagram & tag @temeculawines, #temeculawinechallenge #tastemidweek & #drinktemecula. Don’t forget to check in at the winery!

Here’s what we’re giving away:

Each week, we will give away (2) SIP Temecula Passports, good for 5 wine tasting flights at participating Temecula Valley wineries, Monday through Friday.

At the end of the contest, we will announce one grand prize winner from the month, who will receive (2) Reserve tickets to the People’s Choice Blind Tasting and Awards event on November 12, 2017.  This prize package includes a walk-around blind wine tasting and seat at the People’s Choice awards dinner including a 5-course tasting menu and wine pairings.

Don’t Forget: You can capture as many wine milestones as you like to up your chances of winning!

Instagram account must be public for your entry to be considered.

View full terms and conditions here: Terms and Conditions

Happy sipping!

Wine Challenges:
1. Take a selfie with a Temecula Valley winemaker
2. Taste a Temecula Valley wine made from a French grape
3. Convince tasting room staff to let you try a Temecula Valley barrel or tank sample
4. Taste a Temecula Valley Sangiovese
5. Document a delicious Temecula Valley food and wine pairing at one of our many wine country restaurants
6. Taste a Temecula Valley Syrah
7. Take a photo of wine grapes on the vine
8. Take a photo with tasting room staff
9. Taste a DRY (not sweet!) Temecula Valley sparkling wine (bonus if it’s made with the Methode Champenoise!)
10. Take a photo with one of the many vineyard dogs out in Temecula Valley wine country

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2017 Temecula Valley Winegrowers Hall of Fame

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

Temecula Valley vintners were excited to introduce the latest Hall of Fame inductees at the 34th Annual Grape Day conference held on April 13, 2017 at South Coast Winery in Temecula, California. The inductees honored were John Poole and Peter Poole.

The Temecula Valley Winegrowers Hall of Fame was introduced in 2016 by Phil Baily, owner of Baily Winery and member of the Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association (TVWA) Board of Directors. The first inductees into the Hall of Fame were Vince & Audrey Cilurzo and John Moramarco. At the time, Baily noted “The recent passing of wine country pioneer Vince Cilurzo prompted the TVWA Board of Directors to consider ways we could honor his memory. In discussing this, we realized that other pioneers should be recognized, most notably Audrey Cilurzo, because Vince and Audrey partnered in their accomplishments. John Moramarco was unquestionably the key leader of our rise in the 1960s and for the following thirty-plus years.”

Vincenzo and Audrey Cilurzo planted the first commercial wine grape vineyard in the Temecula Valley. They established Cilurzo Vineyard and Winery as one of the first wineries in the Temecula Valley. As husband and wife, they championed the growing of red wine grapes, most notably Petite Sirah. They offered help, encouragement and support to all the wineries that followed them.

John Moramarco planted one of the first commercial wine grape vineyards in the Temecula Valley in 1968 while working for Brookside Winery. In the late 1980s his efforts helped Riverside County create the citrus/vineyard zone which preserved agriculture and laid the foundation for the remarkable growth of wineries over the ensuing years. Moramarco also worked to mobilize Riverside County, the City of Temecula, State and Federal efforts to successfully combat the spread of Pierce’s Disease in Temecula Valley vineyards.

“This year’s Hall of Fame inductees were similarly accomplished and well respected within Temecula Valley’s wine community and we’re very appreciative of their efforts on behalf of all of us,” stated Phil Baily.

John Poole purchased vineyard land in the Temecula Valley in 1969, establishing Long Valley Vineyards, which eventually grew to 165 planted acres. Additionally, he planted one of California’s earliest Syrah vineyards in 1974. John founded Mt. Palomar Winery in 1975; this was Temecula’s second winery. In 1978, he opened the first permanent tasting room and was the first to begin advertising the Temecula Valley as a tourist destination.

Peter Poole, John’s son, was a founding member of the South Coast Vintners Association, a predecessor of the Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association. He served many years as the President and Board Member of the Vintners Association and its successor. Peter took over operation of Mt. Palomar Winery in 1985, making it the first winery in the Temecula Valley under second-generation leadership. For many years, he worked to improve viticulture and winemaking practices in the Valley. He was instrumental in the effort to change the official name of the American Viticulture Area (AVA) from Temecula to Temecula Valley. He pioneered the planting of Italian varieties in California, being the first to plant Cortese in California and Sangiovese in the Temecula Valley. When the area was under siege from the vine destroying Glassy-winged sharpshooter, Peter helped lead the successful fight against the pest and the spread of Pierce’s Disease in the Temecula Valley.

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5 Fun Things to do in Temecula Valley wine country this weekend!

Thursday, June 18th, 2015

funIt’s Father’s Day weekend, so treat him right with a day in wine country.  There’s lots going on, from music to food, entertainment to education.  You pick!  The only rule is – you MUST have fun!

Crawfish Boil
When: Fri, June 19, 6p
Where: Wilson Creek Winery
It’s back! Join us for a traditional Louisiana-style Crawfish Boil. Savor some fabulous wines and feast on crawfish with all the fixin’s while enjoying the sounds of “Shades of J” rockin blues. / $49.95 per person / $39.95 per person, wine club

Wine Appreciation Class
When: Sat, June 20, 10a
Where: Falkner Winery
Designated for all levels of wine knowledge / $45 per person / $70 per person with lunch. / Reservations required by calling 951-676-8231 xt. 109

Moto Barrel Room Tours
When: Sun, June 21, 11a – 2p
Where: Doffo Winery
Showcasing over 100 vintage motorcycles and scooters from classic manufacturers like Ducati, Honda, CZ, Vespa and more, the Moto Barrel Room is open for free tours on Thursdays and Sundays

Father’s Day “Bacon and Syrah” Dinner
When: Sun, June 21, 6p
Where: Wiens Family Cellars
$85 per person / $68 per person, wine club / Celebrate Father’s day in style with a vertical tasting of four past Syrahs along with perfectly paired bacon dishes.

Champagne Jazz Concert Series ~ Spyro Gyra & Acoustic Alchemy
When: Sun, June 21, 4p
Where: Thornton Winery
General Admission tickets – $65 / Gourmet Supper tickets – $140 (3 course meal, concert ticket & assigned table

 

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International Picnic Day is June 18th

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

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Picnics and wine go hand-in-hand.  Which wine makes for the perfect picnic wine, you ask? One of the favorite summer wine choices of the French is rosé.  And with summer coming, it could be a favorite of yours, too.  Made from a wide variety of grapes, rosés can be made still, semi sparkling or sparkling.

Don’t be fooled by the color!  Barely there apricot or a richly hued blush, rosé wines run the gamut in shades, but don’t go thinking that they’re all sweet! Their sugar levels are extensive as well; from bone-dry Provencal style rosé to sweet white zinfandels and blushes.  Rosés are made in just about every winegrape-growing region – and there’s lots to choose from here in the Temecula Valley wine country.   So make sure to include one in your picnic basket!  It will pair perfectly with light summery salads, sandwiches and wraps.

Try out one of these great Temecula Valley rosés:

Baily Winery ~ 2013 Rosé of Sangiovese – Fun, fruity and full of character.

Callaway Vineyard & Winery 2012 Rosé of Sangiovese – Pairs with most foods; a perfect picnic wine.

Miramonte Winery ~ 2014 Rosé – Racy strawberry and candied watermelon notes, a beautiful melon and peach laden mid-palate, and long sensual finish of rose petals and flavors sugar-dusted citrus.

Thornton Winery ~ 2013 Rosé – You’ll enjoy the strawberry/black cherry and lemon-citrus aromas as well as its surprising palate weight and richness.

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Dad.  Ask him when Mom says no!

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

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After decades of discussion (as is most always the case in government!), President Woodrow Wilson approved the idea of an actual Father’s Day back in 1916, followed shortly by President Calvin Coolidge supporting the idea of a national Father’s Day in 1924 to, “establish more intimate relations between fathers and their children and to impress upon fathers the full measure of their obligations”.  After a protracted struggle of over four decades, President Lyndon Johnson signed a presidential proclamation declaring the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day in 1966. Then in 1972, President Richard Nixon established a permanent national observance of Father’s Day to be held on the third Sunday of June.

Father’s Day undoubtedly brings up fond memories for most, whether it’s for something your Dad did, for something he said, or for that one thing he never, ever mentioned that you know he could have!  So how do we repay him for all the things he’s done?  First of all, resist the temptation to take the easy road; he has enough ties and coffee mugs.  What about giving the gift of time? Here’s a few, fun times you can share with Dad, right here in wine country.  Check it out!

Baily Vineyard & Winery Father’s Day Specials at Carol’s Restaurant
Falkner Winery – Father’s Day Lunch Specials and Free Concert
Frangipani Estate Winery – Father’s Day Lunch
Thornton Winery – Champagne Jazz Concert Series – Spyro Gyra & Acoustic Alchemy
Wiens Family Cellars – Father’s Day Bacon & Syrah Dinner
Wilson Creek Winery – Father’s Day Brunch

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