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Summertime! And the livin’ is easy…

Friday, July 2nd, 2021

Barbecues are a great way to enjoy the outdoors! And all that grillin’ just screams for a good red wine. But if you’re thinking it’s too warm for red, think again! With these few tips, finding the perfect summer sip won’t have to put your love of red on hold.

Grillin’ & Sippin’
  • Chill out! Pop your bottle of red wine in the fridge for about 30 mins – or in an ice chest for about half that – and you’ll be amazed at how much more refreshing it will taste.
  • No or Low Oak wines are generally fresher and fruitier.
  • Low to Moderate Alcohol levels usually equate to lower tannin levels for a wine that won’t weigh you down.
  • Light to Medium bodied wines tend to be easy on the palate, bright and light.

So, whether you’re in the backyard or on the beach – serving burgers and brats, or steak and grilled veggies – there’s tons of options for pairing your favorite Temecula Valley wine with whatever you’re serving up.

If the mainstay is red meat, a spicy Zinfandel or Syrah would be perfect. If you’re looking for a more mellow choice, a fruit forward Merlot always works; it’s also great with chicken, pork chops or fish. If your fave is a Cabernet, go ahead and drink what you like. But try not to shortchange your options. Go for a nice red blend for the best of all worlds. And don’t forget about a blush wine; there’s nothing a nice dry rosé can’t do for spicy ribs and coleslaw – or a plate of spicy hot wings!

A few Temecula Valley wine suggestions for your next barbecue:

Baily Winery ~ 2019 Rosé of Sangiovese: fun, fruity and full of character
Miramonte Winery ~ 2019 Rosé: bright strawberry | watermelon flesh | cantaloupe | iris | hibiscus | off-dry
Robert Renzoni Vineyards ~ 2016 Big Fred’s Red: ripe blueberry and black cherry, hints of caramel
Maurice Car’rie Winery ~ Cody’s Crush: cabernet sauvignon, merlot and petite sirah blend
Oak Mountain Winery ~ 2016 Merlot: aromas of black fruits such as black cherry, blackberry and cassis

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Your Toughest Wine Questions Answered

Thursday, April 1st, 2021

Geek Out on All Things Wine with These Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country Rockstars

Grapevines at Sunrise

Wine can be intimidating. We’ve all stood in the aisles of our favorite wine stores scanning the backs of labels for hints of anything that might give us a clue of what the juice in the bottle tastes like. We’ve all donned the deer-in-headlights look when a sommelier asks us what type of wines we prefer. Who hasn’t felt a sense of dread during the daunting wine service ritual, where the server waits expectantly while you swirl, sniff, sip and determine whether they may pour the wine for your guests, all eyes on you?

While being a wine expert isn’t a requirement for kicking back and enjoying a glass or two of our favorite beverage, sometimes a better understanding of how a product is made allows us to appreciate it even more.

Which is why we have brought in some of Temecula Valley Southern California’s best and brightest wine stars to answer some of your most frequently-asked wine questions!

Q: The vineyards are starting to look so pretty this time of year! What is actually going on with the vines right now?

A. Greg Pennyroyal, Vineyard Manager, Wilson Creek Winery & Vineyards

As April approaches the vineyard is leaving its dormant stage and entering its first vegetative stage of budbreak. Wine Grapes (Vitis vinifera) are deciduous meaning they lose their leaves in fall and go into a dormancy period usually starting in late October and ending in April. Grapes also need a minimum of 150 Chill hours, a summation of the hours below 45 degrees, to assure they do not bud out too early and get damaged by a late frost. In Temecula, our standard “Frost Free Date” is April 15, giving a positive spin to a date that is usually not so great.

The grapes’ dormancy period also coincides with the rainy season of our Mediterranean climate – wet in winter, dry in summer, with a coastal influence. Our historical rain average for this time of year would be about ten inches; however we are under four inches to-date. This will assist in delaying a budbreak that is too early, however will require that we irrigate and add fertility as the cover crops and soil biology have had less of an opportunity to increase soil fertility.

After budbreak, the vines will enter a vegetative state where initial growth is remarkably fast. If you visit a vineyard one weekend, the following weekend will look like a different vineyard. Following this growth spurt, the vines set flowers. Grape flowers are very small and inconspicuous. When the flowers emerge, they are wrapped under a small cap called, appropriately enough, the calyptra. When the flowers are ready for pollination a gentle brush will cause the calyptra to pop off and the flower will rapidly open before your eyes, great vineyard entertainment after a glass of wine. The flowers have both male and female parts, so they do not need bees to pollinate. White wines are the first to emerge from dormancy followed by red varietals.

Q: How do winemakers get those tiny bubbles in bottles of wine?

A. Sharon Cannon, Director of Operations, Akash Winery

Those fabulous bubbles that make Champagne or sparkling wine so wonderful are products of carbon dioxide (CO2), created during the fermentation process when sugar and yeast are added to a still base wine. There are three primary ways to make sparkling wine: 

Some winemakers choose a labor-intensive traditional method of trapping the gas in the bottle, which then “lay down,” sometimes for decades, producing high-quality sparkling wine (think Champagne). The most important part of this process is the secondary fermentation, which happens as mentioned, inside the bottle. During this process, the yeast consumes the sugar which is where the carbon dioxide is produced. The wine is then left to lay on their “lees,” (dead yeast cells) for a period of time. While this may sound gross, these yeast cells are what give traditional method sparkling wines their signature toasty, yeasty, brioche-like flavors. The bottles are gradually rotated and tilted until they end up upside down, so that all of this sediment makes its way to the neck of the bottle, which is dipped into a solution to freeze the solid contents, making them easy to remove. Bottles are then topped up with the “dosage,” a combination of sugar and/or wine, donned with a cork and wire cage, and then ready for you to drink.

The Charmat Method (or tank method) is where the winemaker will use a pressurized tank for the secondary fermentation process (think Prosecco). Here the liqueur de tirage (a mix of wine, sugar and yeast) is added to the pressurized tank of still wine, in which the secondary fermentation. The wine, once ready, is then filtered and bottled from the tank. These wines are generally youthful and easy drinking!

Lastly, there is just plain carbonation, where carbon dioxide is simply added into the wine (think of your Soda Stream injecting bubbles into your water). You’ll know this one if you’ve ever had it though, as the bubbles with dissipate very quickly! 

And remember, those bubbles you have in your fridge which you are waiting for a “special occasion” to open: The special occasion is today, friends!

Q. Speaking of stuff getting into my wine, sometimes I see things floating in my bottle? Does this mean the wine is bad?

A. Jim Hart, Winemaker, Hart Winery

There are a number of things that can cause “chunkies” in wine, some of them intentional and others maybe not so intentional. In so-called “natural wines” (so-called because there really isn’t a true definition for natural wines), a certain amount of sediment and haze should be expected, as these wines are usually un-fined and unfiltered. Additionally, these wines are often made without added sulfites, and can occasionally undergo secondary fermentation in the bottle causing haze and “floaties.” More conventional wines are sometimes intentionally bottled without filtration as some winemakers believe filtration somehow strips a wine’s character (not true), and are okay with some sediment in their wine.

The most common cause of stuff floating is with wines that haven’t been properly cold or heat stabilized. Wines that aren’t properly heat stabilized will throw small amounts of haze or, in extreme cases, what appear to be floating globs in the bottle. Wines that aren’t cold stable will, when chilled, lose tartaric acid which will look like crystals (sometimes called wine diamonds).

The good thing about all these things you might find floating in your wine is that none of them are really harmful; just be careful who gets the last glass! 

Q. I love rosé. But how is it made?

A. Nick Palumbo, Winemaker, Palumbo Family Vineyards & Winery

Rosé wine has gotten a bad rap from wine drinkers over the last few decades simply because so much of it has been made to appease the palate of a generation of consumers that grew up on overly sweet, processed beverages. That said there are basically three ways to make a rosé wine which can be broken down into a not-so-great way, a good way, and the best way!

Many don’t realize that all grapes, white or red, have clear juice inside when they first come off the vine. It is the skin of the grape that contains the color; so, in order to get a red wine, the winemaker needs to keep the juice in contact with the skins of a red grape in order for the wine to develop its color, along with everything else that gives the wine structure and flavor.

Some inexpensive rosé wines are simply a blend of finished Red and White wines that in different proportions can make a wine that looks the part but rarely if ever tastes anything like a classic, well-crafted rosé.

Then there is the saignée, or “to bleed” method, which is a really a good way to make two different wines from a single lot of grapes. It is also considered a way of making red wine better or more intense by “bleeding” off some of the juice early in the process, resulting in two separate lots that can be made into both a red and a rosé. If the winemaker is serious about the rosé, a very good wine can be made. However, this rosé is often considered a biproduct of the red winemaking. The locals drink that, while the winery ships the more expensive reds off to market.

The last method is an approach that wineries employ when their sole intent is to make a quality rosé, which results in a rosé that is often superior to the above methods. This method, often called “Limited Skin Maceration” (LSM) is a process in which the grapes are crushed and left in contact with the skins for a limited amount of time. The color can start to develop within minutes for grape varieties with very intense color, or can take up to 48 hours in some cases. When the desired color is achieved, the juice is separated from the skins, and fermentation is started much like a white wine would be made.

I have made wines from both saignée and LSM methods with great success, but am really proud of our current Spring release of our Rosato Secco. This wine is an LSM version of Sangiovese that is perfect for sipping by the pool, pairing with a charcuterie board, or – even better – a classic bowl of moules frites (steamed mussels and French fries) served by a beach in Southern California within miles of our beautiful Temecula Wine Country. Drink Local!

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Local Love: Our Favorite Temecula Restaurants Supporting Temecula Valley Wineries Right Now

Thursday, March 4th, 2021

Our Favorite Restaurants with Temecula Wines

Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country is a wondrous destination for discovering world-class wines, stunning vineyard views, talented winemakers, and memorable tasting experiences. But, as much as we don’t like to admit it, Temecula Valley isn’t just wine country. There is a vibrant scene in town with plenty to do and see… and even more to eat and drink.

The beauty of living in a wine region is that even if you’re not out visiting the vineyards, you can still enjoy local wines while you dine. In celebration of keeping it local, we have rounded up some of our favorite Temecula restaurants that prominently feature Temecula Valley wines, so you can keep sipping that beautiful juice, no matter where you are grabbing a bite.

Goat & Vine, 41923 Second Street, #102, Temecula, CA 92590, (951) 695-5600

For the most delicious from-scratch pizzas, sandwiches, salads, and more, head to Old Town’s Goat & Vine. Believing that “Food is more than just nourishment; it is the ultimate expression of love,” Goat & Vine’s team starts the day at 3:00 AM to handcraft pizza doughs, breads, sauces, dressings, and proteins to serve to patrons over lunch and dinner. We often say the same thing about wine and winemaking, so be sure to peruse the many Temecula Valley wine selections on the menu to find the perfect pairing for this thoughtfully prepared cuisine. 

Bluewater Grill, 26700 Ynez Court, Temecula, CA 92591, (951) 308-2722

Who doesn’t love a big platter of oysters on the half shell or melt-in-your-mouth cedar-plank salmon washed down with a cold, crisp glass of Temecula Valley Pinot Grigio? Bluewater Grill features fresh, sustainable seafood prepared to taste, as well as other delicious items like steak, burgers, and chicken. And, they don’t just offer Temecula Wines and local craft beers; they also have a “Taste of Temecula” wine flight, as well as no corkage fee for all local wines, so you can spend the day shopping the wineries for your favorite bottles, and pop one open over dinner in town.

1909, 28656 Old Town Front Street, Temecula, CA 92590, (951) 252-1902

Named for the year the old Machado building was rebuilt after burning down in 1908, 1909 was originally home to a trading post, livery, auto shop, church, and bar (the Long Branch Saloon was actually known as the roughest place in town – several bullet holes still dot the ceiling!). Today, the eye-catching (and totally safe!) restaurant and bar cooks up upscale pub classics alongside craft cocktails, brews, and wine – including wine list sections dedicated to local white, rosé, and red wines.

Cork Fire Kitchen, 44501 Rainbow Canyon Road, Temecula, CA 92592, (951) 976-3404

Known for seasonal, farm-fresh cuisine using many locally-sourced ingredients, including from the chef’s very own garden, it should come as no surprise that Cork Fire has a prominent selection of great Temecula Valley wines to choose from on the wine list. Sip a bottle of Lorenzi Vineyards Chardonnay, or Wiens Fumé Blanc while you take in golf course views or cozy up by the roaring outdoor fireplace on the veranda for the perfect Temecula food and wine experience.

The Great Oak Steakhouse, 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula, CA 92592, (888)-PECHANGA

Nothing works up an appetite quite like winning (or losing!) a few hands of blackjack – or a day of wine tasting – so head on over to this classic steakhouse at Pechanga Resort Casino for a totally indulgent meal of 100% Prime Black Angus beef and other decadent dishes (hello, lobster mac & cheese and au gratin potatoes!), paired with one of the many available Temecula Valley wine selections. You will find full sections of the restaurant’s massive wine list – which has been recognized as noteworthy by the editors of Wine Spectator and Wine Enthusiast magazines – dedicated to local wines, as well as individual Temecula Valley bottlings included among varietal selections.

E.A.T. Marketplace, 28410 Old Town Front Street, Temecula, CA 92590, (951) 694-3663

There are few restaurants more dedicated to sourcing clean, sustainable, locally-driven foods than E.A.T. Marketplace. Making it part of their mission to support Temecula Valley’s local economy, they naturally offer a selection of Temecula wines and craft beers to sip alongside their healthful and delicious menu items. The restaurant also regularly partners with local wineries for events and programs that help tell the wine and culinary story of Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country.

Got a favorite Temecula restaurant that also pours your favorite Temecula wines? Tell us about them! #DrinkTemecula

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And Here’s How It All Began…

Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Brookside Winery 1971

In the 1850s, Temecula became a stop on the stagecoach lines that were becoming the logistical route of choice in California. So popular was this route, a post office was set up in town which was a rare institution in California at the time. Settlement increased during the late 1860s as displaced Confederates moved West in the wake of the Civil War.

Because of the region’s isolation, Temecula retained many of its Native American, Spanish and Mexican customs and culture long after California was ceded to the United States. Throughout time, however, Native American lands were being purchased or seized and in 1875, the final blow was delivered when tribal nations signed a treaty relinquishing the remainder of their land in the Temecula Valley. A decade later, the Native Americans who remained were relocated to the Pechanga Reservation.

The railroad line boosted Temecula’s economy when the route was extended to the region in 1882. Unfortunately, the line was abandoned later that decade due to damage from incessant flooding. The major industries during these years were stone quarries, cattle and shipping. During the American Prohibition of the 20s and 30s, the Temecula Valley operated its share of bootlegging and speakeasies.

In 1904, Walter Vail arrived in Temecula and bought nearly 90,000 acres in the region. His family would do much to influence and shape the town during the first half of the 20th century. The Vail family’s biggest achievement was damming the Temecula River and creating Vail Lake in 1948.

In 1961 Mahlon Vail had been successfully operating the enormous Vail Cattle Ranch for nearly six decades. He was in his seventies and his health was failing. With no immediate heirs Vail began actively seeking a buyer for the ranch. One of those potential buyers contacted Richard Break, an experienced farm manager and broker from Fresno. The buyer wanted his professional opinion on the feasibility of growing citrus on the property. After reviewing temperature records for the Temecula area kept by the University of California at Riverside, Break became convinced that the climate and soil conditions in the valley were better suited for the growing of wine grapes.

In 1964 Vail successfully completed negotiations on the sale of the ranch to Kaiser Industries and Macco Realty, who together formed the Rancho California Development Corporation. Throughout 1965 the development company mapped out its plans for a “Master Planned Community.” The community would include commercial and industrial sites as well as residential and agricultural development. The campaign attracted the attention of a number of notables including then California Governor Ronald Reagan, who purchased a sizable portion of the Santa Rosa Plateau.

Another Hollywood couple who saw an opportunity to pursue a long-held dream of retiring to a sizable estate with a comfortable Mediterranean style adobe was Vincenzo and Audrey Cilurzo. In 1967 they purchased 40 acres of property down a long dirt road known as Long Valley Road (soon to become Rancho California Road). The Cilurzo’s established the first modern commercial vineyard in the Temecula Valley in 1968.

In 1974, the founding of Callaway Winery (by Ely Callaway, of golf fame) marked the beginning of large production winemaking in the Temecula Valley. Callaway, sold the winery in 1981 to Hiram Walker and Sons. John Poole opened Mount Palomar Winery in 1975, and in 1978 the Cilurzos opened another Temecula winery at a new site. Their original vineyard, Temecula’s oldest, is now owned by Maurice Carrie Winery. Today, there are over 40 wineries in the Temecula Valley.

Though Temecula became an incorporated city in 1989, the region officially became an American Viticultural Area (AVA) in 1984. Modern Temecula Wine Country is located east of the Rainbow Gap in Riverside County and the Temecula wine community has grown considerably since its humble beginnings.

Copy courtesy of The City of Temecula and Robert Renzoni Vineyards

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How Our “New Normal” is Actually a Better Normal

Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Cheers to 2021!

Well, the day we never thought would come finally did, and 2021 is officially in full swing. While the world is still a bit topsy turvy, and so much uncertainty remains, the start of a new year seems as good a time as any to look back on lessons learned, and contemplate what comes next.

Temecula Valley Wine Country went through a roller coaster of changes in 2020, as we implemented new policies to keep our customers and staff members safe, and experimented with creative ways to keep you engaged. While some changes we will be happy to say goodbye to when things get back to normal, some new practices we may hang on to just a little bit longer, if not forever, because, well… we kind of like them.

Change can often be uncomfortable, but it isn’t always a bad thing. So, in celebration of flexibility and fresh new starts, we would like to share the top five things that came out of 2020 that we will not be saying goodbye to in 2021.

  1. Reservations and Seated, Guided Tastings

When wineries were asked to implement social distancing protocols by limiting visitor numbers and requiring spacing among tables and tasting areas, reservation systems and more formal seated tastings made it easier to manage customer flow, while still ensuring a pleasant experience for guests.

What many of us realized in the process was that these guided tastings allowed us to get to know our customers better, and gave our guests more opportunities to ask questions, and learn more about our wineries and the wines in their glasses. While we look forward to welcoming guests back to our communal – and convivial! – tasting bars, we don’t anticipate our wineries giving up the more intimate, seated, guided tasting format any time soon. In fact, we look forward to new ways our wineries can use this type of experience to educate and entertain Temecula Valley visitors!

2. Taking Things Virtual

Why just get a bottle of wine when you can get a bottle of wine and meet the winemaker… virtually, from the comfort of your living room couch? 2020 was the year of the Zoom happy hours and virtual experiences and boy did we have fun with these! From virtual winery tours to wine club parties to educational tastings and more, Temecula Valley wineries took to the Internet to meet their fans and share their sips and stories.

Not only has this been a great way for us all to stay in touch with customers, but it has also been a way for us to make new friends across the country. We know wine lovers in other states and cities may not be able to visit us all the time, but Temecula Valley wineries can ship wine to just about any state, and the Internet knows no state lines! We can’t wait to see you on our computer screens over a glass or two of wine soon.

3. Trying New Wines

Nothing makes you crave new things quite like being stuck in your house, not being able to see your loved ones, and having all your favorite activities canceled for months on end. This boredom led many of us to take up new hobbies, learn different languages, and master new skills.

It led us to branch out of our sipping comfort zone to give some of those hard-to-pronounce grapes (hello, Falanghina!) a try. One of the most beautiful things about Temecula Valley is that we grow dozens of different varieties that all thrive here thanks to our Southern Californian Mediterranean climate. We know we won’t be losing that sense of adventure when it comes to wine discoveries in 2021; we hope you will keep up the curiosity as well!

4. Cool New Events

Temecula Valley is known for some pretty amazing events year-round thanks to gorgeous vineyards, stunning properties, and nearly 365 days of sunshine. When social distancing and outdoor tasting and dining requirements were put in place, Temecula Valley wineries had to get really creative when it came to event planning. The result? Fun new outings like drive-in movies, socially distanced yoga, and intimate (but at totally spaced-out tables) wine dinners among the vines.

Temecula Valley wineries have always thought outside the box when it comes to interesting grape blends, planting new varieties, and producing exciting wines. We are excited to see what’s next on the event horizon once things open back up. Hopefully some of these new, creative event concepts stick around, because there are few things better than sipping a bottle of your favorite Temecula Valley wine from the flatbed of your truck while watching “The Sandlot” on the big screen at sunset.

5. Gratitude

We’ve said it once, and we will say it again. We could not have gotten through 2020 without our loyal and supportive customers and visitors. We have also been reminded of the power of a simple thank you; of taking time to acknowledge those around us who keep us smiling – and afloat. Many Temecula Valley wineries have said thank you with special offers, discounts and promotions on wine, dining and shipping. No doubt we will continue to see these in the coming months. But we will never stop feeling grateful for YOU, and all that you as visitors and fans do to make our Wine Country so special.

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Harvest is Here! Discover the Unique Tools and Techniques Temecula Valley Winemakers Use to Produce Some of Your Favorite Wines

Tuesday, September 1st, 2020

Winemaking is equal parts agriculture, science, and art. This magical combination has allowed for infinite permutations and possibilities for different styles and flavors of wines, and captivated wine lovers all over the world.

While many may assume that wine is simply fermented grape juice, from soil to grape to cellar to glass, there are, in fact, many, many options available to the winemaker when it comes to crafting a unique product. Some are more common – like aging the wine in small or large oak barrels. Other techniques are less traditional, and may be linked to a winery’s signature style, a winemaker’s preference, or a desire to experiment with something new and different.

Since harvest in Temecula Valley has officially begun, we thought it would be fun to pull back the curtain on some of this magic that happens in the winery. So, we caught up with a few Temecula Valley winemakers who shared with us some of the offbeat techniques and traditions they use to create the region’s world class wines.

Nick & Cindy Palumbo
Owners, Palumbo Winery

Palumbo Vineyard & Winery

In addition to only farming their own grapes, which allows them to pick precisely and by slope and orientation based on ripeness, Palumbo does all fermentation in open bins as opposed to tanks. Owner and winemaker, Nick Palumbo, feels this offers a much more hands-on approach.

“Oxygen is our friend during fermentation and punching down, and stirring of the active fermentation helps in a lot of ways,” he says. “Healthy fermentations, the efficient dissipation of heat (without costly, energy-hogging cooling units), and the binding, or ‘locking in’ of various flavor and color components are just a few reasons we do this.”

Palumbo also works with whole cluster pressing of their Viognier (grapes are neither destemmed nor crushed), resulting in more delicate, less astringent white wine due to the limited contact with skins and stems; and, hand-sorted, whole berry fermentation on their reds. Here, grapes are destemmed but not crushed, allowing the berries to more or less crush themselves under their own weight and begin fermenting with the addition of yeast. Winemaking in this way slows the release of tannin and color in order to give more control over the vinification process.

Steve Andrews
Owner, Oak Mountain Winery

Oak Mountain Winery

In addition to having the first 104-foot subterranean wine cave in Temecula Valley, boasting more than 400 barrels of wine, a kitchen, banquet and tasting room, Oak Mountain is also home to a new, cutting edge piece of machinery, called “The CUBE.”

This vibrating grape destemmer ensures the gentlest possible process of removing grape berries from their stalks, and allows for raisined and overly mature grapes to remain on their stems so that they can easily be removed as waste. Only fruit free from defects is then recovered for fermentation, ensuring the resulting wine is clean and high quality.

Somerset Winery

Kurt Tiedt
President, Somerset Winery

Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Rome, Georgia…Temecula? What’s old is new again! Temecula newcomer Somerset Winery is making wine in Amphorae – giant vase-shaped clay vessels – a winemaking technique that originated thousands of years ago.

Winery president Kurt Tiedt, and winemaker David Raffaele, were intrigued by these vessels while attending the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium in early 2020, and felt that they could be the key to taking their winery to the next level.

Since then, they have acquired three uniquely different amphorae – a classic Terracotta “Rotunda,” a “Terracotta Cigar,” and the “Opus 17” – a behemoth that stands over nine feet tall, has a six-inch thick interior, and weighs more than 8,000 pounds. All are imported from Italy.

These ancient vessels have seen a resurgence in recent years in many well-known wine regions because of their unique ability for winemakers to produce a wine that is somewhere between oak and stainless steel aged. While stainless steel tanks – being totally free from oxygen during fermentation – preserve the primary fruit characteristics of a wine, oak does the opposite. The porous nature of wood allows for plenty of oxygen and imparts other aromas, flavors, and additional tannin to the wine. Clay takes the best of both worlds – it, too, is porous and allows for the oxygen that is essential for giving a wine texture; but, it is neutral, so it also preserves the purity of aromas and flavors of the grapes, perfectly amplifying them in the case of quality fruit.

Somerset’s first Amphorae Syrah was just released, and is full-bodied, with mineral and earth tones and a creamy, smooth finish.

Jim Hart
Winemaker, Hart Winery

Hart Winery

Using Mission grapes from the Cazas and Hunter vineyards planted sometime between 1882 and 1905 on the Pechanga Reservation – by far the oldest wine grape plantings in Temecula Valley – Hart Winery produces a fortified Angelica wine made using the original winemaking techniques of the Franciscan missionaries. Angelica wine dates to the Mission period in California, and its name is thought to have been taken from the city of Los Angeles.

According to family history, the Hunter vineyards were planted from cuttings of original Mission Grapes taken from Mission San Luis Rey de Francia in Oceanside. Once extensive commercial vineyards, these two small remnant vineyards are still farmed by the descendants of the families who planted them well over 100 years ago.

DNA testing of the vines done by U.C. Davis confirms that these vines are original Mission rootstock – genetically identical to grape vines originally brought to California from Spain by Spanish Missionaries.

“[We at] Hart Winery are proud to work with the families who have preserved these heritage vineyards,” says Owner and Winemaker, Jim Hart. “We are honored to work with this exceedingly rare, ancient old vine fruit.”

Thought to be one of the first wines made in California, Angelica wines are fortified with brandy and aged for many years. Hart chooses to age their Angelica for over two years in old wine barrels, set outside in the warm Temecula sun, where the wine reacts with the heat and oxygen to develop deep caramel, hazelnut, root beer, and toffee notes. The barrels are never topped, and the heat plus the extended exposure to oxygen in un-topped barrels, ultimately changes the wine from its original light red to a brownish color as is typical for Angelica wines. It’s a rich, layered wine that makes for a decadent after-dinner drink with (or as!) dessert.

Akash Patel
Owner, Akash Winery

Akash Winery & Vineyards

Sometimes unique winemaking methods take the form of superstitions and traditions!

Akash Patel, Owner & Director of Akash Winery & Vineyards tells us they bury 11 pennies in the ground on the first day of harvest. According to the family, it’s an Indian good luck tradition that Mrs. Patel started for the winery. We’ll drink to that!

Happy Harvest!

Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press Enterprise/SGNC

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Welcoming Guests Back ~ Safely & Responsibly

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020

Temecula Valley Wine Country

The safety of visitors, loyal customers and staff of Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country is our greatest priority. With the sudden global spread of the COVID-19 virus, we are trying our best to keep our guests and employees safe and appreciate your understanding of new policies and processes. We appreciate your patience while we navigate this “new normal.”

The Riverside County Board of Supervisors announced that the Governor’s office approved a variance that would allow “Dine-In-Restaurants” to re-open in our County. The Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) has defined that “dine-in restaurants” includes restaurants and brewpubs, as well as supplier licensees that permit tasting and/or private events (such as wineries, breweries, and craft distillers). While our wineries are still not allowed to offer any sort of wine tasting on property, they will be allowed to sell glasses of wine and bottles of wine, as long as their guests purchase a meal provided by the winery restaurant, a licensed caterer or a food truck. 

While this is much welcome news, many of our wineries will need some time to transition into this new way of doing business and to ensure that they are following the health and safety guidelines set forth by the State of California and Riverside County.  Many of the wineries have reduced their capacity and are requiring reservations. We will be keeping our website current with information that we receive from the wineries as to their operating hours at this time. Official site Joycasino Provides more than 3700 slot machines from well-known software developers. The site also has sports betting, life dealers and e-sports  However, please contact the winery you wish to visit prior to visiting to ensure you’re aware of their policies and procedures. Please click HERE for a list and information on current winery operating hours and requirements prior to your visit.

Thank you, wine-loving friends, for your continued support of our Temecula Valley wineries and we look forward to welcoming you back!

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A Reflection on The Past Few Months And A Big Thank You to Our Consumers

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020

As Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country begins the slow and careful process of welcoming visitors back to wineries and restaurants safely after this long break, we are all taking a minute to reflect on what the past few months have taught us, and what the future holds for our wine region.

Here are the top three things we have learned:

  1. Temecula Valley is resilient.
    From its humble start as a one-stop-sign town to its current status as one of the world’s top wine destinations, Temecula Valley has come through a lot in its relatively short 52-year history. The region has battled drought years, a near extinction thanks to a nefarious vineyard pest in the 90s, tough competition from other wine regions, and now a major shut-down that has been particularly hard for a place that relies on visitation to stay afloat.

    And yet Temecula Valley always seems to emerge stronger than ever. Much like the Pierce’s Disease situation that nearly wiped us out forced us to invest in the research and tools to transform vine planting, grape growing and winemaking in the region, so has the current situation surrounding the pandemic encouraged us to regroup and find new and creative ways to reach our customers.

    The people of Temecula Valley are light on their feet when it comes to pivoting, and it is one of the biggest keys to our resilience. Many of you have probably taken part in the dozens of virtual wine tastings our wineries have been hosting, or taken advantage of the great packages and partner offers that they have pulled together for customers. Many of you have watched as our winemakers and tasting room staff have taken their cameras and laptops to the vineyards and barrel rooms, offering virtual tours and the chance to get to know them better. If you are interested in podcasting your own shows, then the best laptop for podcasting is obviously the one that will support your media files. This nimbleness is what has allowed us to keep your wine country alive through these challenging times.

    We know we will be faced with other obstacles in our future. And we know we will band together to come through them as we always do – stronger than ever.

  2. Our community is all heart.
    Almost without exception, the moment the stay at home orders were announced, our wineries started to not only figure out ways to support their employees in the face of layoffs and furloughs, but they found ways to give back to the community as well.

    South Coast Winery Resort & Spa and Carter Estate Winery and Resort contributed 50% of online wine sales to provide food and other provisions to furloughed staff members. Fazeli Cellars took 50% of the proceeds from bottles of their 2014 Mehregan and 2018 Norooz sold to go directly back to employees to help with expenses. Leoness Cellars and others created similar programs.

    Mount Palomar Winery not only did a social media promotion for healthcare workers, but they also donated bulk wine to several distilleries to create hand sanitizers.

    Robert Renzoni Vineyards, who had to furlough 40 of their 47 employees as a result of the shelter in place orders, began selling “Employee Support Packs,” with 50% of the proceeds going back to their employees. The Renzoni family also donated 50 generously sized hams for employees to pick up, along with a bottle of wine.

    Doffo Winery organized weekly grocery boxes for their team, while Palumbo Winery donated several cases to the Cocina Urbana group in San Diego and to Goat and Vine in Temecula to give to chefs and wait staff who had been furloughed.

    Wilson Creek Winery donated 50,000 wine tasting tickets (to the tune of $1.25 million) to healthcare workers in Riverside and San Diego for redemption once they are back open. They also donated 1,000 bottles to Temecula Valley Hospital.

    Peltzer Family Cellars donated 300 bottles to the Temecula Valley hospital healthcare workers.

    This is just a handful of ways our community has stepped up and given back during the COVID-19 pandemic. No matter how tough things get, we always look out for each other, and other communities in need.

  3. Our friends and fans are loyal… and the only reason we are all still here today.
    These past few months have been tough on everyone. But your support – whether it was maintaining your wine club membership, joining us for virtual tastings, ordering wines online or over the phone, engaging with us on social media, or simply reaching out to say hi – has gotten us through this.

We cannot thank you enough for your ongoing loyalty to our wineries and the Temecula Valley region in general, and we cannot wait to see your smiling faces back in our tasting rooms and restaurants hopefully very soon.

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Temecula Valley Wine Country Lands in USA Today’s 10Best Readers’ Choice as Best Wine Region

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019

Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country has been named by USA Today as a 10Best Readers’ Choice for “Best Wine Region.” Out of 20 nominees across the United States, Temecula Valley Wine Country ranked number three in the country by an expert panel and the public.

“This recognition is a testament to the hard work and passion of our winegrowers and winemakers. Our wine region is beginning to get the recognition it deserves for its award wining wines, dining, and experiences,” says Kimberly Adams, President and CEO, Visit Temecula Valley.

“From our talented winemakers to chefs to tasting room staff and everyone in between, Temecula Valley is filled with passionate people who work tirelessly to make the region so special,” said Krista Chaich, Executive Director of the Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association. “We are delighted to be counted among so many other great wine regions in this 10Best list, and that visitors everywhere have fallen in love with our community and our world class wines, just as we have.”

Temecula Valley Wine Country is located in the center of Southern California, just 60 minutes from San Diego, Orange Country, and Palm Springs, and 90 minutes south of Los Angeles. There are now nearly 50 wineries in the significant and diverse Temecula Valley AVA, a major AVA in Southern California. The wine region continues to gain recognition for its award-winning, premium varietal and proprietary blended wines.

More than three million travelers visit Temecula Valley to enjoy the region’s welcoming wineries, learning experiences, concerts and signature events, outdoor activities, and exceptional dining. Less-busy weekdays provide potential opportunities to converse with talented winemakers and friendly winery owners. Hotels, resorts, bed and breakfast inns are available among the vineyards, in and near Old Town Temecula, within the canyon, and along hotel row in Uptown.

For more information about Temecula Valley Southern California or to start planning your trip, go to VisitTemeculaValley.com.

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Why Temecula Valley’s Climate is Perfect for Wine Grapes… And Vacationers!

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

“It’s too hot to grow wine grapes in Southern California.”

We hear this a lot out in Temecula Valley. Every time we do, we smile to ourselves as it’s an open invitation to explain why this wine region is not only perfect for vacationers, but for producing world-class wines as well.

Picture your ideal vacation. Does the image of waking up to a beautiful sunrise that warms the air just enough that you can enjoy coffee out on your balcony or get in a quick morning run in slightly crisp air with no sticky humidity sound about right?

Does sitting on a patio enjoying a Southern California lunch in 72-degree weather, sun shining, not a cloud in the sky in mid-November while your friends back home are kicking muddy slush from an early snowfall off their boots before getting into their cars on a grey and dreary day sound appealing?

Imagine yourself in a luxurious king-sized bed at your hotel after a fun and sun-filled day of wine tasting, hiking or shopping, all windows open to allow in the cool night breezes to lull you to sleep.

This is vacationing in Temecula Valley, all year round. It also describes key aspects that make this region suitable for growing wine grapes.

A Mediterranean Climate is generally classified as having a long growing season (early Spring to late Fall) of moderate to warm temperatures, moderate winters and relatively low rainfall. Since regions of Mediterranean climate are influenced by cold ocean currents during the Summer months, the weather during this time is dry, stable and pleasant with strong diurnal shifts. This means that, while the days are warm and sunny, the nights cool down quickly. These regions receive most of their precipitation for the year during the Winter months.

Major wine producing regions with Mediterranean climates include Tuscany and parts of Southern Italy, the Southern Rhone Valley, Provence, most of Greece, many parts of Spain, Southern Oregon, Baja California, the Napa Valley and, of course, Temecula Valley. These are many of the regions we think of when we think of premium wines and dream travel experiences.

What makes Temecula Valley at home among these well-known wine regions is that it boasts long, sunny days that allow wine grapes to ripen and develop the sugars that will ultimately turn the grapes into wine. However, the region is home to significant maritime influence as well. Just 22-miles from the Pacific Ocean, Temecula Valley is bordered by coastal mountain ranges and inland valleys. As the sun warms the inland valleys east of Temecula, the warm air rises, forming a low-pressure area which pulls the cooler, much heavier air from the Pacific Ocean in through two breaks in the mountains — The Rainbow Gap and the Santa Margarita Gap. This cool air creates the pattern of warm sunny days, breezy afternoons and cool nights, ideal conditions for the wine grapes to develop complex flavors and aromas, while retaining pleasant balance and freshness from desirable acidity levels.

Think about it: Virtually year-round sunshine and warm or moderate temperatures, cool nights, relatively little rainfall, not to mention high quality wines, unique wine-tasting experiences, and the relaxed, welcoming vibe that is synonymous with Southern California. Whether you’re a wine enthusiast or just looking for a dream vacation, Temecula Valley should be added to your list of top wine destinations to visit.

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